NEW ORLEANS SUPERSTITIONS (1886) by Lafcadio Hearn

In this episode I review new research on vitamin D that has led me to slightly modify my recommendations, and we discuss how multitasking and the internet are literally rewiring our brains. He loves fighting Nazis, who, incredibly, really existed, and were (if anything) even more evil than comes across on a movie screen. So what are the myths and facts? As I discussed in my original comments on ear plugs, playing a brasswind instrument (or any instrument, for that matter) is tantamount to managing a feedback control system. Actually, lip reading is an amazingly ineffective way of communicating. Phantom shock has been defined as an electric jolt sensation that the patient perceives even though the implantable device or other cardiac event monitor indicates that no such event occurred.11,15 Although patients with ICDs had a decreased fear of dying, one study13 showed that one-third of these individuals—especially those who reported being anxious about automatic ICD shocks—had greater anxiety levels and increased avoidance behaviors. The vast majority of pregnant women wear a necklace during pregnancy and it has nothing to do with whether the baby will be born with or without a cord wrapped around its neck.

Older adults need to be especially vigilant about drug safety, according to the December issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. All bleeding parameters were measured, including: blood flow, blood viscosity, ADP-induced platelet aggregation, fibrinogen concentration, partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and prothrombin time (PT). The available measurement methods range from simple to complex with all methods having limitations and some degree of measurement error. These symptoms occur when the bloodstream is overloaded with oxygen. Not true! Any exact idea concerning the use of each particular kind of charm I have not been able to discover; and I doubt whether those who practise such fetichism know the original African beliefs connected with it. Older patients will experience an even more difficult time with both hearing and the quality of sound with competing background noise.

Putting an open pair of scissors under the pillow before going to bed is supposed to insure a pleasant sleep in spite of fetiches; but the surest way to provide against being “hoodooed,” as American residents call it, is to open one’s pillow from time to time. Bryant stated that he heard gunshots at the exact time the shooting occurred. A Spanish resident told me that her eldest daughter had been unable to sleep for weeks, owing to a fetich that had been put into her pillow by a spiteful colored domestic. The added step is that blood is drawn from your iv to be placed into the epidural space. The respondents in this particular study were adults. Complete physical and medical history. The first step is a complete hearing and lifestyle evaluation.

Again, this is a result of application and not inherent to how an EQ works. Mosquitoes are crepuscular, most active at dawn and dusk. In some of the legends and historical accounts they are presented as having near-human stature. There is no record of a publicized case around that time in which a Q-tip was blamed for damage to someone’s ears. This refers to the voyage made by Mikołaj Krzysztof “the Orphan” Radziwiłł in 1582–1584. However, these initial reports were based on in vitro studies or were poorly controlled and have not been substantiated. If you suffer from allergies and sinus problems, try to avoid allergens wherever possible, such as keeping the home dust free, staying indoors when the pollen count is high, avoiding food and drink which contain high levels of sulphates and other preservatives, such as wine, beer and foods with artificial flavors and colors, especially mono-sodiumtglutamate, (MSG).

For years, patients have been told that nothing can be done to relieve tinnitus (ringing in the ears). The charm contained some bones, feathers, hairs, and rags–all wrapped together with a string–and a dime. No superstitious person would have dared to use that dime; but my friend, not being superstitious, forthwith put it into his pocket. The presence of that coin I can only attempt to explain by calling attention to another very interesting superstition connected with New Orleans fetichism. The negroes believe that in order to make an evil charm operate it is necessary to sacrifice something. After split from husband Brian Austin Green. Ear candles can be extremely risky, mainly because you’re suspending a burning candle above your head, and also because if your ear is facing upwards there is a risk of contaminants and wax flowing back down your ear canal.

🙂 as far as I know , only borderline and bipolar are left, getting closer and closer there. The gift consisted of a “frizzly hen”–one of those funny little fowls whose feathers all seem to curl. “Mars’r Henry, you keep dat frizzly hen, an’ ef eny niggers frow eny conjure in your yard, dat frizzly hen will eat de conjure.” Some say, however, that one is not safe unless he keeps two frizzly hens. Breaking a mirror is considered bad luck in Russia, as is looking at one’s reflection in a broken mirror, but the effect is also more severe than 7 years of bad luck (as in American culture). Ringing in the ears, which is no better or disappear call tinnitus. The negro’s terror of a broom is of very ancient date–it may have an African origin. It was commented upon by Moreau de Saint-Méry in his work on San Domingo, published in 1196.

“What especially irritates the negro,” he wrote, “is to have a broom passed over any part of his body. He asks at once whether the person imagined that he was dead, and remains convinced that the act shortens his life.” Very similar ideas concerning the broom linger in New Orleans. Often things better when the T or H is connected to an injured ear cleaning, or a virus or ear infection or drug reaction or injury to the head or neck, etc. Moreover, the broom is supposed to have mysterious power as a means of getting rid of people. “If you are pestered by visitors whom you would wish never to see again, sprinkle salt on the floor after they go, and sweep it out by the same door through which they have gone, and they will never come back.” To use a broom in the evening is bad luck: balayer le soir, on balaye sa fortune (to sweep in the evening is to sweep your good luck away), remains a well-quoted proverb. I do not know of a more mysterious disease than muscular atrophy in certain forms, yet it is by no means uncommon either in New Orleans or in the other leading cities of the United States. But in New Orleans, among the colored people, and among many of the uneducated of other races, the victim of muscular atrophy is believed to be the victim of Voudooism.


A notion is prevalent that negro witches possess knowledge of a secret poison which may terminate life instantly or cause a slow “withering away,” according as the dose is administered. A Frenchman under treatment for paralysis informed me that his misfortune was certainly the work of Voudoos, and that his wife and child had died through the secret agency of negro wizards. Mental aberration is also said to be caused by the administration of poisons whereof some few negroes are alleged to possess the secret. In short, some very superstitious persons of both races live in perpetual dread of imaginary Voudoos, and fancy that the least ailment from which they suffer is the work of sorcery. It is very doubtful whether any knowledge of those animal or vegetable poisons which leave no trace of their presence in the blood, and which may have been known to some slaves of African birth, still lingers in Louisiana, wide-spread as is the belief to the contrary. During the last decade there have been a few convictions of blacks for the crime of poisoning, but there was nothing at all mysterious or peculiar about these cases, and the toxic agent was invariably the most vulgar of all–arsenic, or some arsenious preparation in the shape of rat poison. The story of the frizzly hen brings me to the subject of superstitions regarding animals.

Something of the African, or at least of the San Domingan, worship of the cock seems to have been transplanted hither by the blacks, and to linger in New Orleans under various metamorphoses. A negro charm to retain the affections of a lover consists in tying up the legs of the bird to the head, and plunging the creature alive into a vessel of gin or other spirits. Tearing the live bird asunder is another cruel charm, by which some negroes believe that a sweetheart may become magically fettered to the man who performs the quartering. Here, as in other parts of the world, the crowing hen is killed, the hooting of the owl presages death or bad luck, and the crowing of the cock by day presages the arrival of company. The wren (roitelet) must not be killed: c’est zozeau bon Dié (it is the good God’s bird)–a belief, I think, of European origin. It is dangerous to throw hair-combings away instead of burning them, because birds may weave them into their nests and while the nest remains the person to whom the hair belonged will have a continual headache. Test products were collected and counted for compliance and new units distributed at visit 4.

The apparition of a white butterfly means good news. The neighing of a horse before one’s door is bad luck. When a fly bothers one very persistently, one may expect to meet an acquaintance who has been absent many years. There are many superstitions about marriage, which seem to have a European origin, but are not less interesting on that account. “Twice a bridesmaid, never a bride,” is a proverb which needs no comment. The bride must not keep the pins which fastened her wedding dress. The husband must never take off his wedding ring: to take it off will insure him bad luck of some kind.

If a girl who is engaged accidentally lets a knife fall, it is a sign that her lover is coming. Fair or foul weather upon her marriage day augurs a happy or unhappy married life. The superstitions connected with death may be all imported, but I have never been able to find a foreign origin for some of them. It is bad luck to whistle or hum the air that a band plays at a funeral. If a funeral stops before your house, it means that the dead wants company. It is bad luck to cross a funeral procession, or to count the number of carriages in it; if you do count them, you may expect to die after the expiration of as many weeks as there were carriages at the funeral. If at the cemetery there be any unusual delay in burying the dead, caused by any unlooked for circumstances, such as the tomb proving too small to admit the coffin, it is a sign that the deceased is selecting a companion from among those present, and one of the mourners must soon die.

It is bad luck to carry a spade through a house. A bed should never be placed with its foot pointing toward the street door, for corpses leave the house feet foremost. It is bad luck to travel with a priest; this idea seems to me of Spanish importation; and I am inclined to attribute a similar origin to the strange tropical superstition about the banana, which I obtained, nevertheless, from an Italian. 293B (trans-6-cyano-4-(N-ethylsulfonyl-N-methylamino)- 3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-chroman) was a generous gift from Dr. It does not require a very powerful imagination to discern in a severed section of the fruit the ghostly suggestion of a crucifixion. I will conclude this little paper with selections from a list of superstitions which I find widely spread, not citing them as of indubitable creole origin, but simply calling attention to their prevalence in New Orleans, and leaving the comparative study of them to folklorists. Turning the foot suddenly in walking means bad or good luck.

If the right foot turns, it is bad luck; if the left, good. This superstition seems African, according to a statement made by Moreau de Saint-Méry. Some reverse the conditions, making the turning of the left foot bad luck. It is also bad luck to walk about the house with one shoe on and one shoe off. or as a creole acquaintance explained it to me “c’est appeler sa mère ou son père dans le tombeau” (It is calling one’s mother or one’s father into the grave). An itching in the right palm means coming gain; in the left, coming loss. Never leave a house by a different door from that by which you entered it; it is “carrying away the good luck of the place.” Never live in a house you build before it has been rented for at least a year.

When an aged person repairs his or her house, he or she is soon to die. Never pass a child through a window; it stops his growth. Stepping over a child does the same; therefore, whoever takes such a step inadvertently must step back again to break the evil spell. Never tilt a rocking-chair when it is empty. Never tell a bad dream before breakfast, unless you want it “to come true”; and never pare the nails on Monday morning before taking a cup of coffee. A funny superstition about windows is given me in this note by a friend: “Il ne faut pas faire passer un enfant par la fenêtre, car avant un an il y en aura un autre” (A child must not be passed through a window, for if so passed you will have another child before the lapse of a year.) This proverb, of course, interests only those who desire small families, and as a general rule creoles are proud of large families, and show extraordinary affection toward their children. Even from this very brief sketch of New Orleans superstitions the reader may perceive that the subject is peculiar enough to merit the attention of experienced folklorists.

An environmental sample (for example, a small amount of soil or water) might be collected to measure contamination in the environment at a specific location. Negro superstitions confined to the black and colored. population; II. Negro superstitions which have proved contagious, and have spread among the uneducated classes of whites; III. Superstitions of Latin origin imported from France, Spain, and Italy. I have not touched much upon superstitions inherited from English, Irish, or Scotch sources, inasmuch as they have nothing especially local in their character here. It must be remembered that the refined classes have no share in these beliefs, and that, with a few really rational exceptions, the practices of creole medicine are ignored by educated persons.

The study of creole superstitions has only an ethnological value, and that of creole medicine only a botanical one, in so far as it is related to empiricism. All this represents an under side of New Orleans life; and if anything of it manages to push up to the surface, the curious growth makes itself visible only by some really pretty blossoms of feminine superstition in regard to weddings or betrothal rings, or by some dainty sprigs of child-lore, cultivated by those colored nurses who tell us that the little chickens throw up their heads while they drink to thank the good God for giving them water.